What should be my approach and CAT percentile to get into IIMs?

Thanks for A2A Mr. Rohitash Kumar !!! I don’t know anything about you ( means educational background) but i am trying to write down a general answer for this.

Not only CAT score will help you get admission into IIM but also other things that matters like-

  • 10th/12th marks
  • Graduation Marks
  • Sectional score of CAT
  • Interview
  • Work Experience

Now you are thinking about CAT means you are perusing graduation or completed your graduation or may be you are a working professional.

If your pursuing graduation then focus on your graduation fully with preparation of CAT and if you are a working professional then be continue with your job because your work experience plays an important role during interview.

Lets come on Preparation part-

Before start preparation make your mind set-up regarding your dream IIM. Find all detail about your dream IIM like what percentile required for interview call, sectional cut off is required or not etc. This blog may help you for same- Cutoffs for top MBA Colleges and B-Schools based on CAT Score

After making strong determination towards your dream IIM come on the syllabus part. Syllabus of CAT is broadly divided in three sections-

  1. Quantitative Ability (QA) [34 Questions]
  2. Data Interpretation & Logical Reasoning (DILR) [32 Questions]
  3. Verbal & Reading Comprehension (VARC) [34 Questions]

For detail syllabus of each section please visit- CAT Syllabus – Complete Details of topics required for CAT 2018 Exam

A complete preparation is done in following steps-

  1. Basics
  2. Practice and Testing

1.Basics

For making basics the effective and time saving way is ‘join a coaching’. Mostly i prefer Online course. See my previous answer why i prefer online education- Mayank Singh's answer to Which coaching​ is better​ for the CAT, online or off?Now the days a lots of online courses available for preparation of CAT . You can subscribe anyone of them but i am here talking about one of them that is preferred by students due to lowest price and effective material. You can subscribe this from here – Online CAT Coaching Course for CAT 2018 Exam Preparation

See reviews of students for this course here: What is your review of Handa Ka Funda?

If you want to see the course is actually better or not then you must see the past year results of that course. You can see results of this course here: Results and Testimonials from CAT Students –

Video Tutorials:

More than 750 videos will provides through this course that covers whole syllabus of CAT. These video are designed effective, interesting and student centeric manner. You can access these video anywhere and as much time as you want till the validity of course.

Online Forum:

This is most interesting feature of this course. Here student can post their doubts and these doubts are further solved in doubt clarification class or solution is provide through email. Here students can discuss their doubt to other registered students like a class.

Live doubt clarification classes:

Every weekend live class is arranged for doubts clarification that are posted on online forum or received through other medium. These class is taken by Mr. Ravi Handa sir, an alumni of IIT Kharagpur and Founder of this course. He have more than 10 year experience of this field.

Study Material:

A well designed study material is also provided in PDF format, document form and question for practicing of CAT.

Mock Tests:

10 Full-length CAT Mock Tests in latest pattern to help you crack CAT.

Affordable:

The of this course is starts from Rs. 5999 only that is lowest in market. Many discounts also available on festivals and national occasions.

See demo video here: Online CAT Coaching and Bank Exam Preparation

2. Practice and Testing

Practice as much as questions that you can, Solve every question that you see. Please avoid solving same type of questions.

Solve all previous year questions that you have. If you don’t have then get them here- Download Free Books and CAT Material –

Give mocks more and more. These mocks will shine-up your preparation. After giving any mock analysis that mock test. Take a help of this blog for analysis of mock- How to Analyze Mock CATs to Improve your Scores and Percentile


If your beginner in preparation then take the help of following blogs-

CAT Preparation Strategy – Tips for Beginners Part 1

CAT Preparation Strategy – Tips for Beginners Part 2


Thank You

Enjoy Learning!!!

19 Replies to “What should be my approach and CAT percentile to get into IIMs?”

  1. HI

    Some people plan to prepare for the CAT exam years ahead of taking it. They enroll themselves in CAT preparation courses through face to face coaching or online. So, you may be asking if, with all the pressures of managing day to day life, including perhaps a full time work load, it be possible to prepare for the CAT exam in two months?

    With planning, preparation, and the right strategy, you can crack the CAT exam in two months.

    Part one in the preparation process is to sit down and with a focused and methodical approach, start with an honest analysis of yourself first. What are your strengths? Where are you good at? What are your areas of improvement?

    Where do you need more time to practice? This analysis can be done by taking up a CAT mock test. Take the test as though you were answering the real one. Take it seriously. And then, when you are done, see the patterns of your results. What key points come up? Are you weak in vocabulary? Do you take more time in reading comprehension? Do you have mastery of quantitative fundamentals? Are you able to complete the mock test by the required time? Do you blank out and get nervous?

    Knowing where you stand is a great ground work to knowing how to prepare and be ready in two months. So, you have two months, where do you begin?
    You begin with the knowledge that you have on your strong points and weak area. Chart out your performance in each section, into four main quadrants:

    1. Good Speed, Good Accuracy. Strategy: Lesser focus. You are already good.
    2. Good Speed, Bad Accuracy. Strategy: Look at your practice answers. Where is the mistake happening? Is there a pattern? Assess and improve.
    3. Bad Speed, Bad Accuracy. Strategy: Put in the most focus into this section. Work by researching on easy tips and techniques to improve the speed and accuracy for these types of questions.
    4. Bad Speed, Good Accuracy. Strategy: Practice. Practice hard. Practice more. Practice will improve speed. Get easy strategies on improving and keeping the momentum that are available online

    Once you have made your assessment, Familiarize yourself with the CAT examination. Know the parts of the test. The CAT is made up of Quantitative Ability or mathematical aptitude, Verbal Ability or your English language skills and Data Interpretation and Logical Reasoning. The questions on Data Interpretation and Logical Reasoning are on Graphs, Charts, etc. The online CAT contains only 2 sections, with Data Interpretation clubbed with Quantitative Ability and Logical Reasoning clubbed with Verbal Ability.

    Quantitative Ability section is made up of topics in Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Mensuration and all those topics which you have studied prior while in school.

    Verbal Ability covers reading, grammar, comprehension and vocabulary.
    Then, divide the work load into two simple steps.
    Step one. See your performance in the vocabulary section of the mock test. Are you good at knowing the meaning of difficult words? Is there a lot of room to improve?

    Then, if so, set a target. Let us say to memorize thousand difficult words in two months. Divide it up into chunks and seriously master each chunk. Memorize with a fresh mind .

    Read books like Word Power Made Easy by Norman Lewis to improve your vocabulary skills. You can use the difficult words assigned for the day in conversation or in your writings to help you practice. Improve your context skills and learn how to free associate. Play word games online or with friends and crossword puzzles.

    Use memory tricks like mnemonics. Practice using mock vocabulary tests. They are available free online. Target to improve your results each time. Use flash cards available from online CAT preparation courses to practice your vocabulary. Get excited about learning new words.

    Here is a list of suggested book titles to help you as a CAT aspirant in your qualitative/vocabulary section:
    Online Exam Preparation, Free Tests, Online Courses and Mentorship

    Next, see your performance in the reading comprehension section of the mock test. Are you quick in picking up the context and meaning of what you are reading or do you need some time? Practice by doing a lot of reading. Read books, articles, blogs, websites, newspapers etc. of varying topics and length.

    Reading newspapers like the Hindu, Economic Times etc is a good start. Certain international newspapers and magazines like The New York Times, Economist and New Yorker (all available online) will give you international perspective and good reading practice.

    This will improve your reading speed and comprehension. Here is a list of suggested book titles to improve reading comprehension:
    Page on wordpandit.com

    Step two. See your performance in the quantitative section of the mock test.

    The basic idea is to get your fundamentals strong.  Generally, quantitative questions in the CAT are based on simple concepts, and this makes it an absolute must that one has a working knowledge of these concepts. For this, a few core skills should be developed. These core skills include accuracy and speed. (Refer to the four quadrants mentioned earlier.)

    It also includes the ability to perform simple and/or complex calculations under time pressure; and the ability to use logic and reasoning while solving mathematics questions. Furthermore, pacing is an important aspect. It involves the practice of moving onto the next question if you are stuck on a single question so to cover more of the test. Do not waste most of the time in a few questions while missing out on the rest.
    Here is a list of suggested references to improve quantitative skills for the CAT:
    Online Exam Preparation, Free Tests, Online Courses and Mentorship

    Rest assured, you can prepare for the CAT exam in two months by consistently taking mock tests, keeping track of your scores, and constantly reassessing your performance into the four quadrants. Be disciplined and drill for the CAT exam every day. Keep a daily schedule, and rigorously prepare. Let us say eight to ten hours a day for thoughtful preparation.
    For your preparation, you can try the route of face to face coaching, online courses, or a combination. There are a number of online courses available.

    • Handa ka funda: helps you in online CAT Coaching with the help of videos.
    • totalgadha.com: helps you with online CAT preparation; providing lessons, questions, mock tests, exam results and discussion forums for CAT aspirants.
    • Pagalguy: an MBA resources website offering you a well frequented forum for applicants from all over the world.

    Be confident and sleep well. One day before the CAT exam, just relax, go the movies or mall. You are now ready to take the CAT exam.

  2. Step 1- Self Evaluation
    You have to crack  the cat in 4 months, so you have 120 valuable days left. The first thing  you must do to start CAT preparation is evaluate where you stand today.  Give a full mock test from TIME/IMS/CL (you can pay and sit for  individual mock tests) and see how you compare against the competition.
    Identify  what sections you’re strong in. More importantly, identify what  sections you’re weak in. These sections are going to take the bulk of  your time in the next stage
    Step 2- Sectional Practice
    It’s  time to get a few Arun Sharma books or a coaching institute’s study  material and get cracking. Devote 3-4 hours every day practicing your 4  main sections- Quant, Verbal/Reading Comprehsion, Logical Reasoning and  Data Interpretation. Keep on giving sectional practice tests. Focus on  your weak areas. A very poor percentile in a single CAT section can be  enough to ruin your entire score. After 2 months or so of practicing  sectional tests, it’s time to move to step 3
    Step 3- The Mock Test Gauntlet
    You  have to give a 100 mock tests before you sit for the CAT and you have  roughly 60 days left till the CAT. Start off by giving a full length  mock test every day for the next 30 days. Study your results and your  mistakes. Analysing your result is the most important aspect of giving  mock tests. Ask yourself these questions
    Why did I make that mistake?
    Analyze the correct approach to solve the question and ingrain the method. You should never the same mistake again.
    Why do I make repeatedly make mistakes in a particular section?
     If this is the case, it’s time to brush up on your sectionals and practice that particular section.
    Why am I not able to finish the paper on time?
     You’re likely wasting too much time on excessively hard questions which  you should skip or you are solving questions in an inefficient manner.
    After  the first 30 days of this stage, you’ll have a month left till the  CAT.  It’s time to take some leave off work or college. Move up to a  pace of 2 mock tests along with sectional practice of your weak areas.
    Step 4- Final Touches
    It’s  time to put 4 months of CAT preparation to the test. Start taking it  easy 2-3 days before the test day. Be confident that you have prepared  well and go and ace that exam. You may have questions at this point-
    Which coaching institute should I join?
    There  are many good coaching institutes to join. TIME, IMS and Career  Launcher are always sae bets. You can our site to find a center near  your location.
    What books do I need?
    You can check out this article- Best Books for CAT Preparation
    Do I need to read newspapers?
    News  papers are recommended, but not required reading. They help you improve  your vocabulary, but there are many better ways of doing that. From the  GK perspective, only IIFT has a general knowledge section.
    How do I get so many CAT mock tests?
    40 mock tests- Subscribe to the mock test packages of 2 coaching institutes
     15 Mock tests- Get Previous Years' CAT Papers (1999 – 2014)
     45 mock tests- Try used book stores, ask your seniors/friends or online coaching providers

    Sourced from my blog:  How To Crack The CAT in 4 Months

  3. From 2015, CAT has been divided in to three sections.

    1. Verbal Ability and Reading Comprehension
    2. Logical Reasoning and Data Interpretation.
    3. Quantitative Aptitude.

    Now, you can't take risk of leaving any topic in any section. Initially, when there were two sections, people could leave some topics from each section, still they managed to get good percentile. But this has been changed from last year.

    Approach for QA-

    Quantitative Aptitude section was very easy last year, many students were surprised to see that there was not even a single question from Functions, Permutation and Combination, Probability, and Graphs. They asked very simple questions from Profit-Loss, Work, Interest, Number System, and Set theory. Basically, any one who had studied till class 10th, would have been able to score 99+ percentile in this section.

    IIMs have realized that QA section was biased towards Engineering Students, hence they entirely changed the pattern of QA section. They gave very basic questions to create a level playing field for  students from Arts, Commerce, and other non engineering background.

    So, the advantage, that Engineers used to have, has been taken away.

    You need not  do a lot of work in this section. If you work on your basics, you can very easily score 99+ percentile in this section.
    Resources that you can use are –

    Buy the Quantum CAT book –
    Quantitative Aptitude Quantum CAT: Common Admission Test For Admission into IIMs (English) 1st Edition – Buy Quantitative Aptitude Quantum CAT: Common Admission Test For Admission into IIMs (English) 1st Edition by Sarvesh Verma Online at Best Prices in India – Flipkart.com

    And join Handa Ka Funda  Online CAT Coaching Classes – MBA 2016                                                              . It is a nice online Coaching for CAT preparation, various topics are taught by alumnus of IIT KGP, he himself has been a 99+ Percentiler in CATfor multiple times. Moreover, they charge a very nominal fee compared to other coaching classes like TIME, and Career Launcher.

    You can complete this book, along with Handa Ka Funda coaching, in just 3-4 months.

    Approach for Logical Reasoning/Data Interpretation Section  –

    This can be a make or break section. Many students got 99+ percentile in QA and Verbal section, but they were unable to clear the cut off of Logical Reasoning Section. Reason?

    Well, difficulty level of this section was insanely high. Also, most people, in general, do not focus on this section. And this habit was very disastrous for many students who appeared for CAT 2015. Many students got less than 50 percentile in this section, despite having overall score of more than 90 percentile. But such score is of no use, as IIMs consider individual score for each section.

    Remember, now they check you on every parameter.

    Last, they gave a very good facility of using calculator in exams.

    People were happy that they could use calculator now. But, it was of no use. Kind of questions that they asked in DI section were also logical in nature. Moreover, it was not a physical calculator, it was an online calculator, which required Mouse to put in Numbers.
    Let me tell you, many students found it more worthwhile to do calculation orally than using online calculator. So, I would suggest you to work on you calculation ability.

    Learn Tables up to 25
    Memorize square up to 30

    Instead of memorizing, I would suggest you to learn the trick given in Quantum CAT, and tips  by Handa Ka Funda. If you want to ace this section, you should be comfortable with numbers. You should be able to add, subtract, and multiply two digit numbers without using pen-paper. If you can't do this now, it would take at least one to two months of practice to be able to add, multiply two digit numbers.

    For Logical reasoning and DI, I would not suggest you to buy any book. Online test Series of IMS, coaching material by Handa Ka Funda, and Past year CAT papers are more than sufficient for it.

    Start from today, and keep solving questions related to Logical reasoning.

    Approach for Verbal Ability and Reading Comprehension section  –

    If you had primary education from an English Medium school, I believe you would  be comfortable in Reading Comprehension and Verbal Ability section of the CAT.  This section is not going to pose a huge problem for you, all you need to do is  complete the Verbal Ability book by Sujit Kumar, and you will do fine.
     Also, I would suggest you to read daily articles from The Hindu.

    Cracking VA/RC in CAT for Hindi Medium students:

    However, if you had primary education from Hindi Medium school, VA and RC section of CAT is going to be the biggest hurdle in cracking the CAT Exam. I, being from Hindi Medium School, faced a huge problem in this section. I could not even understand one para from The Hindu news paper. If you are facing the problem similar to mine, then you can follow whatever I did. By following these tactics, I increased my percentile in Verbal section from 72 something percentile  to 96something percentile in this section.

      All I did was, I used to religiously study each and every article of The Hindu, in case, I could not understand the meaning of a word, I took help of Hinkhoj; Hindi English dictionary.


    I even made a list of all the words that I encountered while reading Articles, also, I used to revise those words on daily basis, by following fixed routine. However, if you really want to ace this section, knowing the meaning of a word is not enough, you should know how to use that word as well. For that, I would suggest you to visit this link- Find out how strong your vocabulary is and learn new words at Vocabulary.com.

    I am sure it is going to be of great help to you.

    Economical Analysis of what I have suggested  –

    IMS Test series                        5,000 rupees

    Handa Ka Funda                     5,ooo rupees

    Quantum CAT                         600 rupees

    How to prepare
    for VA RC
    Arun Sharma                           700 rupees

    The Hindu                               240*10  = 2400 rupees( Considering you would read
                                                                                                      it for 10 months)

    Total  =          13,700 rupees

    Best of Luck with your CAT preparation.

  4. It is often said that CAT is an exam that requires only 4 months of intense preparation; and in many ways that remains true. Having said that, a 12-month preparation schedule gives you massive advantages that a 4-month sprint simply cannot offer. The two most important being -i) Learning math from fundamentals and having lots of practice to digest simple topics and ii) Cultivating a reading habit and acquiring a comfort level across different styles and topics. These two are probably the most important success factors in CAT preparation and having a long preparation-window gives one the luxury of planning this without undue pressure.

    The old adage "Early bird catches the worm" holds good for CAT preparation as well. And the sooner you put together a plan the better it is.

    Preparation Plan and Strategy

    In the early stages of CAT preparation, students often struggle to make sense of all the moving parts. One exam that requires you to have a grasp of trigonometry, CAGR and paragraph structures can be a bit overwhelming at times. It takes a while for the big picture to emerge and until then it is important to focus on the small details and learn the basics well. This is where having a clear plan helps,

    We have put together a broad outline for preparation plan that incorporates all the topics included in CAT preparation which can be found here. Note that we have merely provided a starting point and it is incumbent on the student to create his/her specific plans.

    Best wishes for CAT preparation.

  5. A simple theory : Practice, make mistakes, analyse, learn, don't repeat the mistakes.

    • If you want some guidance when it comes to basics, get yourself enrolled in a coaching institute in case you don't have anyone to guide you right now. Solve as many questions as possible. Start with the easiest ones. CAT distribution is biased towards easy – medium question type. Forget about difficult questions, if you are not a WizKid. Difficult – Very difficult questions don't hold much importance.
    • Solving questions will help you to identify which questions are actually solvable, what you can solve, your way of solving Vs efficient solving. More importantly, what you must skip. This will not allow you to get carried away during the exams. So, practice, practice, practice. I will say go organically for this. Solve basic questions first then medium difficulty level questions. So that you don't mess while identifying questions during CAT mocks or actual.
    • It's important to give youself a reality check. Easiest way is to take a mock. You will see where you and preparations stand. Create an Ms-excel sheet. Note down your percentiles of Mocks total and every section. This will give you a clarity about progress. You can do it for every sectional, chapter-wise test also. You can also track which chapters you have finished or must finish during a period with an Excel.
    • Start taking mocks as early as possible. Do not wait for completing the entire course. This doesnot make any difference. You need an early performance indicator. Most of the institutes come with in-built snapshots of Analysis report; what kind of difficulty a particular question had of which chapter to whether you were judicious in skipping it. Make it an attempt to find and solve all the easy-medium questions during the exam. Spare few minutes to understand whether it’s solvable. Write the question numbers which you are going to solve while scanning through. Post results think what made you leave a particular attemptable question and your solution efficiency. You cannot afford to spend 10 minutes solving a question which can be solved in 2 mins. Time is the key. You must learn to move on, if you get stuck anytime between 0–2.5mins/question. Track how many easy – medium questions you skipped and try to solve it without peeking in the answer section. Make clean and clear notes of solutions so that you can always refer to them. Make sure you also attempt Fill in the blanks questions of a certain solvable type. There's no negative marking for it. Seek help from coaching faculty members or relatives/friends who have an idea about it if you face difficulty in assessing your mock report.
    • Learn from your mistakes. Don't repeat them. One of the most important lessons. For eg., if you are particularly careless in calculation and you have seen the trends. Make sure you do it patiently when the next time you solve.
    • VA usually consists of RCs ranging from horribly boring to horribly tough. But most of the times, that what looks tough is not tough. Solve some particular type of questions like inference based, database type and structured questions. Don't even bother reading hypothetical questions. And it's not wise to miss any RC. Read all the RCs. Every RC contains few easy questions which must be solved. Read a lot anything ranging from e-books to editorial of The Hindu, posts, blogs, novels to enhance your reading speed and data-retaining capacity, prefer online reads. You must solve RCs in the first 30–35 minutes making it 7–10 minutes each RC. Next category of easy question is Summary questions. You just have to eliminate the wrong answer choices. Fill the missing sentence also are easy kind. Can be practised and mastered. Rearranging has been my weak part. Only thing I can suggest is don't try to match the answer choices. Go by the rank of content, meaning, what should follow what. Talking about cats in one sentence and dogs right after and then about cats can most likely be a wrong rearrangment. Vocab should be solved if you know the meaning. No guess work.
    • LRDI is mostly practice based and solving a lot of questions can be a good practice. So that you have seen a lot questions and probably know the trick to solve it. 10–12 minutes should be enough to solve 1 set. It is the most scoring part. Can fetch you 12–16 marks depending on number of questions you could solve and whether it was solved correctly. Most of the DIs have a hierarchy also. A data from previous question of the same set can give you answers for the next question.
    • Your temperament decides your result. Do not worry in the middle of the exam. This can take a toll and adversely affect your rationale and skills while messing up the current and other sections. Classic example is CAT'16. LRDI was so calculation intensive. Candidates got nervous and messed it up and the next section as well. You must never use calculators. They are no tools. Practice can enhance your calculation speed. Calculate whatever you get, be it a grocery bill.
    • I have heard a good review about books of Arun Sharma. You can solve it end to end. However, you can also try 2IIM Online CAT Preparation. I am a fan of their Quants section. It is very close to CAT and can be referred to assess your preparation. Testfunda has a good LRDI section which can be referred. Solve as many worksheets of different institutions as possible. This will help you prepare a lot of different kind of questions and test your skills. You can couple two test series as well, so that you can know your position amongst different kinds of crowd. As well as, the difficulty of various questions and the best solutions. Also, whether you are able to apply it or repeat mistakes for the same type of questions in another test.
    • While preparing divide your time equally. A day of Maths then VA and then DI and then repeat. With Saturday and Sunday dedicated to mocks and analysis and spare time to update your general knowledge, take a break from studies. Write down your learnings and formulae employed in each mock. Paste it in front of desks. Read, re-read. You may minimize the chances of erring.
    • Study your strengths and weaknesses. Play on your strengths and segregate whether you should learn concepts or skip a particular chapter you are weak at. I would say skip PnC and Probability. They don't have much weightage and the world is scared of such chapters. Start with a chapter having max weightage and also forming a foundation for other chapters. The best technique applied in the exams is divide them in levels. Solve level 1st which should be your strength and follow the hierarchy. CAT tests your skills, and you have time to get skilled and excel at anything.
    • Last 3–4 mocks are very important and close to actual test and give you a real picture of your position. Do attempt them. AIMCATs usually tend to get easier with a number of people joining in at the spur of the moment extending their student base. There are some classes held in the last couple of weeks which will be CAT-customized classes – Different techniques to be involved and what most likely can be a CAT-twist of questions. Attend such classes.
    • You can always find Faculty members available for assistance. You can anytime seek their help. They will be able to guide you better by reading your mock snapshot. I remember, in TIME, we used to have few evenings weekly or fortnightly available for such purposes. Go for those. Don't shy away from anything, even if you have low scores. They will give you the best strategy possible.

    I have given a long answer. I am sorry I don't want to make it longer by adding CAT percentiles. I have already given a lot many answers about trends of CAT percentiles for IIMs. Would be really helpful if you can check them out.

  6. A2A with a 100+ answers

    Ah! Not sure what I would contribute that is fresh and unique to this sea of information. However, here are my 2 cents:

    While your CAT score is not a function of the time invested or the quantity of material solved, it is indeed a function of how much ground can you cover (which depends on your ability to learn new things and adapt to them quickly) and how driven you are during these 3 months. The basics remain the same as I had shared in another answer here:

    Regarding prep, you can have a look at this link: Shashank Prabhu's answer to How many months of preparation is needed to crack CAT (99+ %ile) and how do I prepare?

    You would first need to understand the overall profile of the various top institutes and the tests that they take, and the previous year cut-offs (expected timeline of a week or so). You would also need to figure out your existing level of prep and then work towards bridging the gap.

    To understand your existing level of prep, the best way is to attempt a previous year CAT paper (1990-2008 are readily available) and/or a couple of mocks (again, many are freely available online) and compare your scores with the corresponding performance of test takers (in terms of percentiles) and understand where you stand with regards to the competition. You will then understand your areas of improvement, strengths and if there are any major issues with regards to your content. Once you know that, you can use this knowledge to figure out the institutes which you have the best chance of getting into and those which you can get into on a very good day.

    Once you have identified the institutes that you would like to target, you would need to improve your content accordingly. The strategies to do so vary from one individual to another. Few take mocks, few solve material and rest do a bit of both. You can stick to your learning style and start with the prep. You would also need to prepare a timeline and stick to it religiously.

    You can target something on these lines:

    1) At least 1-2 mocks a week along with their analysis

    2) At least a sectional every day (around 20-30 questions of CAT level)

    3) A couple of yesteryear CAT papers (90-08; all 20 of them) over the next couple of months

    4) At least 2-3 subtopics per day (For example: if numbers is the parent topic, you can target Euler's totient function, Fermat's little theorem in a day; maybe successive division and regular division/Chinese remainder theorem on another day and so on). This will involve understanding/remembering all the basic formulae and the question types that can appear in a test. You might want to start with basics first and then move on to sub-topics that rarely appear in the test.

    5) Regular reading of editorials and newspapers/blogs/novels to get better at written English

    6) Most of all, you would need to maintain that hunger over the entire duration of prep. For every day that you slack off, remember that you are falling that bit behind many of the rest. The test is not that difficult per se. But the quality of the competition (in terms of knowledge, persistence, hard work, enthusiasm) takes it a couple of notches higher.

    To sum it all, around 5-6 months of intensive prep is recommended. If you do not have a background with regard to the institutes, tests, etc. you would need an additional 1-2 months to understand how things work, what is your present level and the desired level that you would need to be at to get into the b-school of your choice.

    All the best!

    Regarding ebooks, there isn't a specific syllabus when it comes to CAT and so, I won't really recommend a particular set of ebooks. You can have a look at the past year CAT papers and figure out the various topics that are a part of CAT or look online for CAT syllabus but again, it would be sketchy. You would however need to go through a few websites regularly if you want to be updated with your prep. I had shared a list in one of my earlier answers here: Shashank Prabhu's answer to Which is the best online website for CAT?

    There are quite a few of them actually.

    For news, updates and general discussions, you can have a look at:

    1. PaGaLGuY

    2. CAT 2015, XAT 2016, IIFT 2015, CMAT 2015, MBA In India, MBA colleges in India

    3. Higher Education in India

    4. Learningroots

    5. Online Exam Preparation, Free Tests, Online Courses and Mentorship

    For free preparation resources, you can visit:

    1. http://www.hitbullseye.com for free mocks and updates

    2. Cracku – Online Test Prep | CAT, XAT, MBA, SBI PO, IBPS, SSC, MBA used to have free mocks last year. Not sure if the trend would continue

    3. Learningroots We have free mocks and sectionals which closely mirror the level of difficulty of CAT so, you can have a look at the same. Also, there are quite a few videos (90+ free videos plus an online course) for conceptual understanding

    4. Coaching for CAT, GATE, BANK EXAMS, CSAT, CMAT, CLAT, IPM, GRE, GMAT, NTSE, JEE, etc. by T.I.M.E., the institute with 23 years of coaching experience For paid mocks and sectionals. You need to be a registered user to access this

    5. Prepare for entrance exams like CAT, GMAT, GRE, SAT, XAT, SNAP, CET, etc with IMS Again, most of it is for registered (paid) students only

    6. CAT-holics Nice blog for conceptual understanding. The LOD of questions is moderate-difficult though.

    Other resources followed by students include Center of Learning , Test Prep Made Fun,Mrunal – Competitive exams Preparation and so on.

    Hope that helps 🙂

  7. Your positive action combined with positive thinking creates success.

    While your CAT score is not a function of the time invested or the quantity of material solved, it is indeed a function of how much ground can you cover (which depends on your ability to learn new things and adapt to them quickly)To sum it all, around 5-6 months of intensive prep is recommended. If you do not have a background with regard to the institutes, tests, etc. you would need an additional 1-2 months to understand how things work, what is your present level and the desired level that you would need to be at to get into the b-school of your choice.

    While the popular perception is that 95+ percentile is enough, the reality is that it will help you cross only the first hurdle. Admissions at IIMs are not based only on CAT percentile, but the candidates overall academic performance and his conduct in the interview.

    IIM admission is a three tier process. In the first phase, the candidates are shortlisted on the basis of their CAT exam performance vis-a-vis cut-off percentile fixed by every IIM independently. In the second phase, the selected candidates are invited for WAT/PI/AWT rounds and in the third and final phase, the candidates who clear the second phase are shortlisted on the basis of their perfomance in every area-CAT score, academic record, extracurricular activities, work experience, performance in interview/WAT/GD.

    Tips for getting good percentile
     You can target something on these lines:
     1) At least 1-2 mocks a week along with their analysis

    2) At least a sectional every day (around 20-30 questions of CAT level)

    3) A couple of yesteryear CAT papers (90-08; all 20 of them) over the next couple of months

    4) At least 2-3 subtopics per day (For example: if numbers is the parent topic, you can target Euler's totient function, Fermat's little theorem in a day; maybe successive division and regular division/Chinese remainder theorem on another day and so on). This will involve understanding/remembering all the basic formulae and the question types that can appear in a test. You might want to start with basics first and then move on to sub-topics that rarely appear in the test.

    5) Regular reading of editorials and newspapers/blogs/novels to get better at written English

    6) Most of all, you would need to maintain that hunger over the entire duration of prep. For every day that you slack off, remember that you are falling that bit behind many of the rest. The test is not that difficult per se. But the quality of the competition (in terms of knowledge, persistence, hard work, enthusiasm) takes it a couple of notches higher.
     So i would suggest to join coaching institute. There are a number of good platforms available for CAT preparation that offer either paid CAT prep courses (like Hand aka Funda) or free YouTube channels (like Takshila Shikshak). One such popular online course that I came across is iQuanta. Their team of experienced faculties and mentors has an exceptional record when it comes to CAT preparation mostly institute, you might feel like an outsider but in iQuanta, mentors are approachable to the students. It also uses the social media platform like Facebook for running sessions which reduces the input assets which makes it, with so reasonable prices.
     2) Over 100 IIM converts are from iQuanta.
     3) 32 Converts are from IIM A,B,C & XLRI alone.
     4) One of the largest online players in CAT arena in just one year.
     5) Two 100%lers and sixteen 99.6+ %lers.
     6) Over 100 aspirants with 95 + %les
     7) Evry one of 6 iQuanta student is in IIM now.
     8) 35 IIFT Calls.
     9) iQuanta provides large number of answers for questions which are directly posted(screenshots, questions) by the Aspirants.
     10) provide weekly Exams and live fb session 6 days /week.
     11) The Perfect stop to score for CAT Aspirants at lowest fees.
     12) Perfect Guidance provided.

    To Know more visit :1) Fb page :https://www.facebook.com/iQuanta.in/

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/

    There are Many Groups on Fb for Cat Prep, But i will refer you the Most Active and Largest Online Platform For CAT Preparation iQuanta Facebook Group (Log into Facebook | Facebook ). In this Group well performing students are administrators and tackle the doubts posted by other aspirants in a timely manner and it�s free of charge. Students often click pictures of the questions and post it on the CAT Preparation group and this gets answered within minutes. Here we also get Tips,tricks and Valuable Insights From Serial CAT Crackers and Mentors. As a result, CAT preparation group has become the largest group of aspirants with nearly 2 lakh members.

    If any one has any credibilitity issues. From iQuanta there have been more than 200 IIM and IIFT converts. I have gone through some work and pulled out some snaps for you.

    Best of luck guys,
     Don't stress, do your best and forget the rest. #rockthecat

  8. First of all, let me clarify that your undergrad college has no bearing on your CAT result. I am from a no name engineering college, and did pretty well.

    Here's what I did:

    Step 1: Do an honest review of your own preparation levels. Download a few sample papers from the web, and solve them. Don't worry about timing, just do them honestly and sincerely. If you're around the 90%ile zone (generally arnd 40% marks) in each section, you may get by preparing on your own.

    Step 2 Option A: In case you're already a whiz, and did great on the self assessment.
    I suggest you buy the Tata McGraw Hill books by Arun Sharma, and finish them cover to cover. Try to fit in all 3 sections each week (preferably each section for 2 days a week).
    The idea is not just to finish each book, and solve each question. You should be able to understand how you solved each question, whether your method was the most efficient solution. The most important thing is that you should see improvement in yourself week on week.
    Join a reputed test series (I vouch for TIME AIMCAT series, they have around 20,000 people giving each test, and that is a fair reflection of your actual preparation levels).
    Every now and then TIME guys also call you for a solving session for 3-4 mock CATs featuring their most reputed faculty. Make sure you attend these.

    Step 2 Option B: In case you aren't a whiz, and the self assessment destroyed any semblance of self-confidence you possessed.
    I suggest you join a reputed classroom program (I vouch for TIME, they were the best in Pune). Even if you are a working professional, I'm sure you'll find a program at a center which suits your timetable. (The TIME center in Pune had morning 6AM-8AM classes 3 days a week, evening 7PM-9PM classes 3 days a week, Sat/Sun classes 2PM-6PM, and plenty others).
    These classes will help build concepts from the ground up, and are a great time saver too (What self study achieves in 4-5 hours is mostly covered in a 1 hour session).
    These classes are also a great way to get your doubts clarified (be they fro your Mock CAT or from a book) from the faculty and your fellow students.

    Step 3: Stick at it and be regular. It's easy to give up midway, or get complacent, or procrastinate and miss sessions (self or coaching).

    make sure you have certain short term goals in mind for every AIMCAT. For e.g., I kept simple aims for myself. A sample:
    No wrong attempt in Quant, no matter what: This meant that I was only attempting around 10-11 questions in the initial days and still getting 1-2 questions wrong (3 months before actual CAT!!). However, this simple aim meant that I was able to improve with every mock CAT I gave, and my best attempt was the actual CAT! (Attempted all 20 questions, 100 %ile in Quant).

    Identify a strength: It was VA for me too (Because I too thought English was my strong suit). Once you have done that, don't be satisfied with anything but the best result from that section EVERY TIME. Be irritated if you don't score 99%ile+ in any mock CAT in that section. Go through the sample solutions in great detail to figure out where you made a mistake. Then make it a strength in the true sense. Make sure that you don't waste any time on that section. I used to be able to finish the VA section in 20 minutes, flat (RCs and all included). That meant that I had a lot more time for Quant and DI than anyone else 🙂 .That can only come with practice. So make sure you practice your strong section.

    Do not tolerate repeated mistakes. Make sure you learn from every mistake you make in every mock CAT, sample test, self administered test etc. A mistake once made should never be repeated.

    On a lighter note: A strategy which worked for me (but I DO NOT recommend to anyone) was that I'd told all my friends I was attempting the CAT. Not clearing the exam after all those announcements would have been extremely embarrassing. The fear of that embarrassment actually made me work harder :P.

    About me: I scored a 99.98 percentile in CAT 2010, in my first attempt, and am currently studying at IIM Lucknow. My preparation methodology was simple: TIME classes five days a week (mine was a 3 month course), a mock CAT on Saturday, and a solving session on Sunday. This ensured that I was preparing for a couple of hours every day for 3 months. The regularity and punctuality ensured that I improved with each mock CAT I took, and the actual CAT was my best attempt.
    Of course, our scenarios are slightly different. I was an engineering student, whereas you are a working professional. However, I think the basics of preparation can stay constant. A lot of my classmates at TIME were professionals too.

    Taken from my answers to the questions: What is the best way to prepare for a competitive exam (CAT/GRE/GMAT) in 1 year without paying any tuition? and Why did I score less in the Common Admission Test (CAT) even after religiously preparing for it? )

  9. Disclaimer:

    Use your best judgement: These things worked for me. This doesn't mean it will work for everybody. Each individual is different.

    Here are a few things that might help.


    1. Study for 7-8 hours a week but regularly.

    This effectively means spend an hour or a little more than that everyday. Don't spend 4 hours each on a weekend. It might appear to you as if there is no difference, but regular study is important if you want to move from 97%ile to 99%ile.

    2. Find ways to stay motivated

    Preparing for CAT is long and grueling. And when you add on the additional pressure of work, you need to find motivation from external factors. I found coaching classes useful for only this reason. They are a sort of reminder that you are preparing for CAT.

    Other than that, they are actually not extremely helpful. There is nothing they can teach which you cannot learn on your own, unless you don't have the desire to do it.

    One way which I would suggest is to write something like "CAT 2015" in a few pieces of paper and paste them in places where you might see them often. Ex: Cupboard, Mirror etc.  [Don't feel this method is too cheesy. It is. But it works. I did it (with a different quote) and I am not ashamed of it.]

    3. Enroll for mocks and take accountability

    Most people do not appear for mocks stating,

    "I am not fully prepared. I will write mocks when I am satisfied with my preparation".

    The fact is, you will never be fully prepared. There will always be things which you could improve upon.

    Hence, do enroll for mocks and attempt them. Don't give yourself stupid excuses.

    "Oh, I had a date with my boy/girl friend."
    "I wasn't feeling well."
    "My mother had given me an important work to do."
    "I had a meeting at work which I had to prepare for."

    Take accountability for the fact that the decision to appear for CAT is yours alone.

    4. Don't fly or get bogged down with mock results

    My best mock score was 97.xx percentile. My worst was 41 percentile.

    These scores happened in two back to back mocks. I was flying high after the first one thinking I could do no wrong and I have cracked the formulae of getting a great score.

    And then I fell flat on my face with my worst performance. It taught me an important lesson. And thankfully, I learnt it well.

    5. Be a part of an online/offline study group

    Make some friends who are as motivated as you are to do well. If you're not going to coaching classes find them through the online sites that are there. Participate in forum discussions and never hesitate to share information.

    A lot of people I know, would try to learn as much as possible, but never help others by telling them what they know or what worked for them.

    6. Stay away or avoid people who emit negativity

    You need to figure out people who can motivate you. Typically avoid people:

    – who brag a lot about 'stuff' they know.
    – whom you might see doing last minute preparation before a mock cat
    –  who do not believe in you and encourage you to do something else. "Let's go for a movie tonight, you can always study later." – No. Thank you.

    7. Prepare in a way that you want to

    Don't let me or anyone else tell you that this is what you should be doing.

    I found two things extremely difficult:
    – Improving my vocabulary
    – Being told to read editorials in newspapers

    I tried. I gave my best. I felt I just wasn't up to it.

    Word cards, carrying a dictionary in my phone, using words in sentences in daily life – nothing worked for me.

    Eventually, I felt it is just too much of an effort.

    Same thing with editorials. I got bored. And thankfully, very quickly.

    So, if you are not comfortable putting yourself through this pain. Don't do it.

    But you have to compensate for it. How?

    Instead of reading newspapers or mugging down words, I used to solve RC passages, do actual sentence correction questions, did paragraph jumbles.

    In short, I spent more time in trying to solve questions. At the end of the day, you need to get right answers. It doesn't matter if you understood the passage or not. No one cares. And there are ways to get good at answering verbal questions by not being excessively focused on words, or reading speed etc.

    8. Have a flexible time table while preparing

    When you are preparing, study something that your heart wants you to study and don't be rigid.

    If you had fixed a slot to do quants, but you don't feel like doing it, then don't force yourself into it. Give equal importance to all sections and study what you feel like studying.

    9. Take breaks

    Watch a movie or television series frequently. Everyday, if you can spare time. It is important to stay fresh.

    After preparing for about 4 weeks, give yourself a week off. Just forget that you are preparing for CAT.

    This will help your brains to get recharged and your focus would improve the next week onwards. This is important because, when the D-Day comes, you need to be at your peak.

    The overall preparation that you had put through earlier should not wear you down mentally on what could be one of the most important days in your life.

    PS: I watched this film, the day before I appeared for CAT. The title is quite apt.

    The Best Years of Our Lives


    I wish you good luck. Do comment here or feel free to message me if you don't want to comment for any reason.


    Further Reading:

    How should I prepare for the CAT ?
    How do I prepare for GDPI for MBA admission?
    Will a year drop after engineering affect my chances to IIM's?


    Thanks for the A2A Ankit

  10. Hello

    With a will to work hard consistently and a mentor to show you the right path, your dream will become a reality. You can start your prep online as this mode gives certain great advantages like your convenient time, low amount and multiple views to understand anything better.

    Also, you have approx 8 months for this CAT. Let us see the things that you can do by spending approx 180 minutes everyday and with 24 hours per week of study.

    1. Read a newspaper online daily. It can done in your spare time. It could be The Hindu or Firstpost. You can also read selective articles from NYTime or Washington Post. Also start Word Power Made Easy by Norman Lewis.

    2. Start watching lectures online. The website of EduSaathi can help you in that. Watch videos of all topics sequentially and solve questions. This will help you to get your basics correct.

    Continue the above two steps for 2 months. For self study, you can also go for the following books,

    For Quant, you can go for either Arun Sharma or Nishith Sinha or Quantum CAT by Sarvesh Verma.

    For LRDI, you can go for Arun Sharma or Nishith Sinha.

    For Verbal Ability, you can look for Arun Sharma & Meenakshi Upadhaya.

    For updates you can follow PagalGuy on web.

    For Video Lectures and practise questions, you can follow Edusaathi on the web and Youtube. You can also use other online portals like EduSaathi, Unacademy, KhanAcademy etc on YouTube. Each student gets comfortable with the teaching style of a different teacher. I would recommend to take the best of each of them. It should not make a difference to you as long as the lectures are free.

    EduSaathi gives you an added advantage of giving you a few practice questions as well. YouTube is the best source of finding huge number of free lectures from various other teachers as well.

    Also, online practise Module "Test-Gym" of CL is also pretty good.

    After that give 10-15 Mocks which will help you to access your standing. Do NOT give a new mock before analysing the previously give mock thoroughly. You may choose to join a coaching institute for regular classes in case you are not feeling up to the mark. If you have covered your fundamentals well, you can always hit your preparation at your coaching centre with full force. You would be able to enjoy your classes and demand good quality from them. It would also help you to access your own strengths and weaknesses related to the CAT exam.

    Having said that, it is the teacher/ Mentor which is going to help you the most. So it will be your mentor who will be helping you down with the way of your preparation and helping you through all discouragements also. Good Mentorship is the only MOST IMPORTANT thing in any exam preparation. Find a suitable mentor to help you through your journey!!!

    Hope it helps!!!

  11. Well, few more tips apart from standard answer. Remember CAT needs full dedication if you try to manage placement and 4th year markes very unlikely you will be able to do justice.!! ( of course few guys manage all things.. but very few …)
    Focus more on verbal as engineers are weak with verbal and good in Quant my personal experience !!
     So read paper and read magazine and keep an eye on current affairs !!
    btw, I you may form study circle on whats app
    or even Doubt Point has study circle option you can form there. Discuss problems spend time on flash cards. 

    CAT is designed to see how you skip tough questions and apply your concepts. Also remember it has some patter 🙂

    – The obvious answer is the Wrong Answer
    With the number of questions going down, there are hardly any 'sitter'questions in the recent CATs. The obvious answer (the one you can guess without spending much time on), is likely to be the wrong one, so be careful.
    – Guess if you can eliminate at least ONE answer
    Do NOT become emotionally involved with any question. Even if you think the questions is outrageously difficult or outright incorrect. Just try to eliminate at least one answer, guess and move on.
    – Know that time can be your biggest enemy
    Certain questions by their very nature take more time to answer. The first step to better time management is to recognize these questions.
    While doing your practice tests, try to become more aware of how much time you have taken to answer a question. You will soon begin to develop an Internal Clock that will help you meet the pacing requirements of the CAT and reduce test anxiety.
    – Compare & Discard
    This is immensely useful for the Reading Comprehension section of the CAT Exam. While there may be a 'Perfect' answer to a question, it may not appear as one of the options.
    What you need to do is compare the different answer choices and choose the best one available. In fact you can usually zero down on two choices and discard the ones that are distinctly different from these two.
    – Use Short cuts Only when necessary
    As I have explained in detail in my book 'Ways of the CAT Winners', it is
    extremely important to be aware of all the possible shortcuts that are available to you, however, these are to be used only if you are unable to apply the 'regular' methods.
    – Analyze your Strengths & Weaknesses and create a study plan unique to these.
    The important thing here is NOT to ignore your strengths, and to stick to your study plan.
    – Managing Test Anxiety
    More than anything else, the CAT is an test of your nerves. There are hundreds of brilliant students who score MUCH lower in the CAT than they do in their practice tests. It is important to manage your test anxiety. You can try using techniques like 'Thought Stopping', 'Self-Talk' and 'Visualization.
    Edit-2
    Edit-2 Last two moths are crucial for this
    I missed out in my previous answer few more in depth point
    Quantitative Ability section is made up of topics in Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Mensuration and all those topics which you have studied prior while in school.
    Verbal Ability covers reading, grammar, comprehension and vocabulary.
    Then, divide the work load into two simple steps.
    Step one. See your performance in the vocabulary section of the mock test. Are you good at knowing the meaning of difficult words? Is there a lot of room to improve? Then, if so, set a target. Let us say to memorize thousand difficult words in two months. Divide it up into chunks and seriously master each chunk. Memorize with a fresh mind . Read books like Word Power Made Easy by Norman Lewis to improve your vocabulary skills. You can use the difficult words assigned for the day in conversation or in your writings to help you practice. Improve your context skills and learn how to free associate. Play word games online or with friends and crossword puzzles. Use memory tricks like mnemonics. Practice using mock vocabulary tests. They are available free online. Target to improve your results each time. Use flash cards available from online CAT preparation courses to practice your vocabulary. Get excited about learning new words.
    Next, see your performance in the reading comprehension section of the mock test. Are you quick in picking up the context and meaning of what you are reading or do you need some time? Practice by doing a lot of reading. Read books, articles, blogs, websites, newspapers etc. of varying topics and length. Reading newspapers like the Hindu, Economic Times etc is a good start. Certain international newspapers and magazines like The New York Times, Economist and New Yorker (all available online) will give you international perspective and good reading practice.
    This will improve your reading speed and comprehension

    Step two. See your performance in the quantitative section of the mock test.
    The basic idea is to get your fundamentals strong.  Generally, quantitative questions in the CAT are based on simple concepts, and this makes it an absolute must that one has a working knowledge of these concepts. For this, a few core skills should be developed. These core skills include accuracy and speed. (Refer to the four quadrants mentioned earlier.) It also includes the ability to perform simple and/or complex calculations under time pressure; and the ability to use logic and reasoning while solving mathematics questions. Furthermore, pacing is an important aspect. It involves the practice of moving onto the next question if you are stuck on a single question so to cover more of the test. Do not waste most of the time in a few questions while missing out on the rest.

    Last important tip
    Use online resources you can learn lot through experiences

    1. Handa Ka Funda – Online CAT Coaching Classes | CAT 2015 Coaching | CAT Preparation Nice resource by Ravi Handa
    2. Pagalguy- Popular and informative  forum for  MBA
    3. Doubt Point – Cool Q&A forum where you can post doubt and get answers from leading institutes like IMS, TIME etc for free!

    Hope this helps !!
    Upvote and share if you like my answer 🙂
     
    Updated Thu. 2,052 views.
    Edit
    Upvotes34

  12. *CAT Preparation*

    Consistency is the key to success. I strongly recommend to maintain consistency in your studies. Do not procrastinate​. Plan your studies and if possible, make weekly targets. For working people, I would suggest to make full use of the weekends and try to manage at least 3-4 hours in weekdays. As I was working, I used to complete the topics (which were taught in the previous week) in weekdays and write AIMCATs and analyse them on weekends.

    VA/RC: The most important thing to ace this section is to increase your reading (CRITICAL READING) speed. Read a lot. Be it newspapers, articles on internet or anything that you like to read. And after reading, try to summarize that in an structured manner. This will help you in organizing your thoughts and will also help in WAT. For those who don't have a habit of reading (like me :p ), I would strongly recommend to start as soon as possible. Believe me, it will help you in longer run.

    DI/LR: Practice. Practice a lot. And do not stop practicing until CAT is over. Monitor your time. Initially it will take a lot of time to solve a set but as you continue practicing, you will definitely see improvement. First complete handout, module questions and then start solving sectional tests.

    Quant: The key to excel in this section is to clear your basics. Try not to study everything at once. Give sufficient time to every topic.

    AIMCATs: As you must have been told already, attempting aimcats is the best way to prepare for CAT. After getting the result, do a thorough analysis of the test. What is the accuracy, which questions you could have attempted, which questions you should have left, weak areas etc. Solve the questions which you had left and were incorrect. Go through the solution of all the questions, you might find a better way to solve that question. Also do not spend too much time on a single question. After 20-30 seconds if you don't get any idea to solve the question, leave it and move ahead. You should be able to at least look at all the questions. I used to note down my learning from each test and set a target for number of attempts for the next test. Also I recorded my scores for each test, this helped me in tracking my performance.

    *Interviews*

    CAT is a game of uncertainty. Even High percentile does not guarantee a convert or sometimes even call. I have seen cases where people with percentile > 99.95 do not get a call from A, B and sometimes S also. I would suggest you to go through the criteria of all colleges. Below are some of the points which I found crucial for an interview:

    – Why MBA? This is something that you need to think by yourself. If answered well, this can drive the interview in your favor.

    – Update yourself regularly with current affairs. Try to have a healthy discussion/debate about current topics with your friends/colleagues. This will help you in giving a diverse argument in the interview. You can also find some detailed opinions and good content on Quora.

    – For freshers, there are very good chances that you will asked about your academics.

    – For people with work ex, know all about your work, company and industry.

    – Do not try to fake your answers. You will be caught for sure.

    – Do not lose hope if you had a bad interview. You never know what the panel liked about you. (Had a hell of a stress interview for IIM C)

    – In the end, you can be asked about anything in the interview.
    (40-50% of my FMS interview was on TV advertisements; Had a discussion about Suits (TV series) in IIM A Interview; XLRI Interview was totally on my work ex)

    PS: I scored 99.88 percentile in CAT’16 and have converted IIM C, FMS, IIM L, IIM K so far.

  13. Not being able to go for coaching has no bearing on the performance in CAT exam as long as you are self motivated and have a drive to get through.

    For 99+percentile in CAT, the following might help:
    * till the month of august, try to wrap up your understanding of all major topics of the 4 test areas, namely quantitative aptitude, data interpretation, logical reasoning and verbal ability.

    * Starting from now, give an online mock test every fortnight .The idea is to gauge the areas of strength and weakness.
    Whatever be the result of any mock test that you give in the run up to CAT, consider it as a barometer to further decide your prep strategy, never consider the result as the be all and end all.

    * Autodidactic mode of learning works well and even saves time in the long haul, just make sure that you join an online group to keep up the momentum.

    * Work on your weak areas during prep but play around your strength in the exam.

    * Once you have built a sound knowledge base viz the formulae, techniques, words et al, start with a refined approach towards the strategy to perform in the exam.

    In CAT 2014, DI and LR were pretty tough . VA and QA were on the easier side.
    One can take a leaf out of this to decide the prep strategy.

    * Read daily …intellectually stimulating stuff.

    * Practice is the only key ..no one can do it for us ..no coaching, no institute but good old practice and perseverance.

    *keep solving ..keep motivated..

    Hope this helps a little…please follow the good online resources for further help and guidance.

    Best of luck!! Score a whopping 99+ and make it to your dream college!!

  14. Thanks for the A2A Suryaday.

    First of all let’s evaluate your chances of getting into IIMs. Please understand that your college of graduation doesn’t matter. Your stream does.

    For IIMA, you need average of X,XII >80% for science stream. You are lucky to just make the cut. Fortunately for you, there is no min. CGPA requirement as such if you are able to compensate your poor academics with your percentile.
    For IIMA, with these academics you will require 251/300 normalized score. Which is 100 percentile and a topper in that too.

    For IIMB, there is no hope based on your academics even with the work experience. The only way to get a call is to be among top 10 in overall CAT score or sectional CAT score.

    IIMC is your best hope. But gear up to work way harder simply because your XII is <80. You will need atleast 99.5+ to make it through the shortlists.

    IIML again gives heavy weightage to CAT, so you have a chance to get a shortlist at ~99.3+. They have 2/50 for XII and 3/50 for graduation score.

    With that in mind I will describe my strategy to prepare for CAT and how I managed a 100%ile in CAT 2015.

    I appeared for CAT in my final year of graduation from IIT Delhi in Civil Engineering.

    I joined TIME institute CP in January 2015 for CAT. After the initial enthusiasm settled (as soon as Jan ends), I attended only those topics' classes in which I was weak or required brushing up. For me that meant leaving most of the quant classes.

    Identifying weak spots

    The very step to any preparation is to analyze your strong and weak areas. If you are good in Time, speed and distance, unitary method but weak in Probability, then you know where to focus your attention.

    If you are inherently weak in a section (like me in VA), then again identify the most crucial question category and focus on them. Practice them everyday. Make sure it comes naturally to you just like any other strong area. (RC is the most imp. topic as per my experience with CAT2015).

    Also, see that you are preparing the right stuff, you don't need to do grammar for VA as it had not come this year and unlikely to come in 2016. If there is any change, you will know in October, and will have sufficient time to prepare for Grammar or any other section then.

    That said a good grammar definitely adds to your Essay writing skills required for XAT or during WAT at IIM interviews.

    DI/LR Strategy

    Study Material: – TIME Modules for DI and LR. Worksheets given by TIME in class. The level of questions is really good in the advanced problems workbooks and class worksheets given in workshops.

    1. Solve all the questions in a chapter after reading and learning the theory very well. If you are not familiar with the theory, then it's not alright to begin questions. Learn all the concepts, shortcuts etc.
    2. Mark the questions you find genuinely difficult or those which require thinking not usual to other questions in the chapter.
    3. Don't solve more than 1 chapter in a day. This is the time required to absorb all the concepts. In fact, each chapter requires 2-3 days for complete absorption.
    4. Wait for a week and solve the marked questions only again. If you are not able to do them, then read the theory again and practice the worksheet again. Else, move onto next chapter.

    CAT 2015 had a really tough section of DI/LR and preparing for all kind of questions did prove to be helpful.

    QA Strategy

    Study Material: – QA for CAT by Arun Sharma in general. For number theory I did refer to Total Gadha notes. They were really good. For Permutations & Combinations, Geometry, Probability, Functions, I referred to my notes from IIT-JEE modules. Even though the level was tough as opposed to CAT level, but that develops thinking ability and gives you an edge against competition.

    The strategy is same as that of DI/LR strategy.

    **Imp** As the CAT introduces subjective questions, it becomes all the more imperative to solve questions to the very ending and not leave in between just getting the idea to solve. Please solve each question by hand till the end. I don't think that I need to stress the importance of practice.

    VA Strategy

    Study Material: – TIME modules for RC and Arun Sharma for RC. I didn't study any grammar, flash cards and parajumbles. (Maybe that explains 97.07). But on seeing the CAT sample paper uploaded in October, I was sure that even if I crack RC, I will easily manage a 90+ in the section.

    Just practice the worksheets and book. I will really advice to purchase Arun Sharma as it explains in a detailed manner how to approach RC passages and solve them. Helped me a lot as I was beginning the prep.

    Importance of Sections

    IMHO, there is nothing like a very important topic or the least important topic in QA, every year they focus on some or the other area. For CAT 2015 it was Geometry. It can be numbers for 2016 or anything else. Prepare each topic very well.

    VA has RC as the most important topic (24/34 questions, all objective, all easy/medium difficulty).

    For DI/LR, I failed to identify what's important, and that worked best for me, as I was aware of almost all the concepts which appeared in the exam. Thus, again, no important topic as such. But you can safely leave Data sufficiency, cubes, number series problems. CAT will focus on paragraph based long questions (as has been trend for past few years).

    Test Taking Strategy

    Step 1: – Spend 2 minutes (neither more nor less) glancing at the questions in the section all at once.

    Step 2: – Start with the easiest first (solve all easy questions) there are usually 8-10 easy questions. (you should solve them in 15-20 mins).

    Step 3: – Move to the most difficult/difficult question according to you. Solve, 3-4 difficult questions. Please make sure you don't evaporate all the time on those questions, just attempt them, if you don't get at anything within 1-1.5 minutes leave that question. Move to other difficult question, repeat. Here also, don't attempt difficult questions from topic you have left completely, even though I will advice you to not leave any topic.
    There are no more than 4-5 difficult questions in a section. (This shall consume at most 12-13 minutes).

    Step 4: – Now move to all other questions, select the question which topic is your strongest. And pursue in descending order of your strength in the topic. You shouldn't follow this strategy from the beginning because there might be easy questions from topics you don't have a very good command over, but you will be able to solve them if you attempt them. Don't lose those free marks.

    This strategy works best for Quant.

    For DI/LR, just see the questions and the passages' overall difficulty. If all questions are difficult but interrelated, then it is worth to give that a shot as an invest of 12 – 15 minutes means 4 questions solved straightaway.

    How to analyze the mocks?

    To appear for Mocks every week is the biggest blunder you can commit in the initial stages of your preparation. Take mocks every 15 days. When there are just 2 months left, take them every week and monitor your progress.

    Step 1: – Take your mocks really serious. The three hour sittings should be just like they will be in CAT. No break, only water in between, as and when required. Rough sheets, one pen, full concentration and utter silence in the room. Personally, I feel the mocks on centre are more stimulating than the ones taken at home as they give you a real feel.

    Step 2: – Once the results are out, you need to analyze how you fared in each section as opposed to how others performed.
    Here, please don't measure per question performance for yourself and for others. Sometimes, some topic might be strong for you or you might have spent more time on a question, or simply a question easy for you might have been average overall. Just get the general idea of your percentile/rank in the section.

    Step 3: – Open detailed solutions, see which particular questions you did wrong and why?, remember "NO MISTAKES ARE SILLY". Unless you didn't know the concept at all, the chances are that you didn't practice enough. All those 'silly mistakes', require practice extensively. Spend time on those topics even if you had prepared them very well in the first instance.

    Step 4: – Even if after identifying your problem areas/silly questions and practicing the topics thoroughly (chances are you will identify the problem as you practice this time), from beginning to end, you are still unable to score in that topic in the next mocks, meet your teacher with specific doubts and take their input on how to solve those questions which you were unable to solve.

    To read my advice on joining the best test series, click here. Rajat Jain's answer to Which is the best test series for CAT?

    Some more Tips.

    How much time to devote: – There is no right answer. Just ensure 3-4 hours on weekdays and 6-7 on weekends dedicated preparation for at least 4 months. Rest depends a lot on your previous level.

    Maintain a Diary: – I think this is the most important thing I did. Track you topic wise progress in each of the three sections. From planning your next day to planing the week (don't go beyond that), it should cover your progress and your goals. Just writing your goals will help you focus more on them.

    The topics to be covered, and how much to be covered (like upto 3 worksheets), topics which need revision, topics where you didn't do well in Mocks. This helps a lot in planning your way to cracking the CAT.

    Speed vs Accuracy: – This is again an issue faced by a lot of aspirants but it's actually simple. If you don't understand the question even after reading twice, leave it. Move ahead. That will ensure speed.

    Accuracy is developed by practicing and analyzing mocks to identify weak spots and then practicing more. Don't give excuses like "I got nervous", "I panicked" Or "I would have done it had I been given 5 more minutes". They won't help.

    5 word rule: – Once you come across a word, search its meaning on phone and bookmark it, learn 5 new words daily. I am sure you will come across 5 new words daily. If you come across more, no problem choose 5 in alphabetical order. Also, you can just open the app where you bookmarked your words and revise them when you are travelling or during interstices (gap b/w activities).

    Working the interstices: – There is a lot of time between various activities which go waste. You can utilize them by working towards you CAT preparation. Here, technology comes to your rescue, reading newsstand, learning word meanings, solving sudokus, magoosh english apps etc are some ways you can utilize the time you have between various activities like travelling from home to work/college/coaching; a free period; an hour with nothing to do; just pull your phone and read/solve.

    Scheduling: – Plan your next day before ending going to bed. The topics you will be studying next day and for how long. Set the goals and stick to them. This is imperative as this helps you make the most out of the day.

    Find your motivation

    I decided to go in business field and leave engineering behind in my third year. My motivation to enter business field was so strong that even during the placements I only applied for management related roles (and eventually got one). The desire to go in the business field was the motivation to clear CAT with a good percentile. Find the motivation to keep you going through the prep phase.
    It can be money, ego, bragging, brand value or work profile. Whatever it is, just make sure you are motivated to prepare for CAT, else each day will be a burden and you won't be able to enjoy the preparation.

    Vocabulary: – For CAT, IIMs have done away with vocabulary based questions but a strong vocab comes handy in RCs. The best way to do that is to learn frequent words as provided in various books for CAT preparation. For eg. Arun Sharma has high/medium/low frequency words. Learn all the high frequency ones at least, most of the medium frequency and leave the low frequency words (unless you have a lot of time and nothing else to prepare).

    Also, read The Hindu editorials (hard copy reading, their app doesn't have full articles), Quartz, Scroll, The Economist articles and The Indian Express editorials. (Best way is to read is to subscribe all the channels on Play Newsstand, and download scroll app).

    Solve Sudoku/Kakuro daily. I personally solve more than 5 sudokus everyday. I will recommend this as the best website Billions of Free Sudoku Puzzles to Play Online or through their app on playstore for phones but any app will work fine. Solve hard puzzles or increase your level slowly and try top be in top 5-7% of solvers. Don't use pencil or checks or guess work, only logic.

    Sidenote: – CAT is an examination which checks your temper and aptitude. So, someone who has prepared for a week and appeared for the examination and manages to keep his calm for the next 3 hours of examination will be able to score better than someone who flusters as soon as he is not able to solve 2-3 questions.

    Hope I could be of help 🙂

    Disclaimer: – All the percentile requirements are approximations based on my interactions with people who were shortlisted and used the following data for IIMA for 2016 shortlists.

    Admission Procedure for PGP 2016-18 batch

    http://www.iimahd.ernet.in/users

  15. I don't really have the 'perfect' credentials since I was in a similar position a few months ago and I am still preparing. I have given a few mock tests and have been getting decent scores. So let me tell you what has worked for me.

    1. Takshzila
      I came across this channel called Takshzila Shikshak while browsing Youtube for videos. And what I stumbled across was nothing short of treasure. For all those who are clueless about how to go about preparing for CAT, this is definitely the first step. The channel has videos on almost all the topics of Quantitative Aptitude, Verbal Ability and Data Interpretation. Those who are quite adept at math may find some of these videos too simple for their liking. But trust me, this has everything covered from Number Systems to Geometry. The videos aren't too long and they cover each topic from the very basics. After a short introduction of the topic followed by a few key points and formulae, they solve a few questions, some of which are previous CAT questions. All in all, this is an excellent resource for those looking to begin their preparation from the very basics. What's more, it is totally FREE!!! 😛
    2. Preparation Material
      The most widely used books preferred by many CAT aspirants are those by Arun Sharma. He has written books for all four subjects- Quant, Verbal, LR and DI. The books are written in a very lucid language, not at all difficult to comprehend. The questions are divided into three levels of difficulty. Solutions to almost all the problems are provided after every chapter. Another good book for Quant would be Quantum CAT by Sarvesh Verma. This has a comparatively larger number of questions. Equally good. You could choose any one among them. Some people also advise using material given by TIME or CL or IMS. I have their material for a few topics. I had IMS material for Verbal. It was excellent. It not only concentrates on the fundamentals (grammar, usage etc.) but also covers all the different kinds of questions which have been asked in CAT and which could be asked in the future. As far as TIME is concerned, the material was good. The questions were decent but there weren't any solutions (the solutions may have been given in the classroom but I had not enrolled for any such program). You could either decide to buy these materials second-hand or actually enroll yourself in one of their classroom programs. As far as Verbal ability is concerned, I would not want to prescribe any specific books since what matters is reading. You must make it a habit to read newspapers everyday, preferably The Hindu or The Indian Express. Most importantly, read their editorial section since that's where the most of the important information and analyses about current issues lie. Also try reading novels and non-fiction books. Ultimately CAT is an entrance test for admission into colleges of management and that means you are expected to know a few things about business. Try reading The Economic Times to get used to economic terms and language. For Logical Reasoning, you could try George Summers. His puzzle books have a lot of questions similar to the ones asked in CAT.
    3. Hit Bullseye
      Having viewed most of the Takshzila videos, I reached a point where I knew I had covered a good amount of the concerned syllabus. I was looking for a way to test myself in actual CAT questions and also against the large pool of test-takers preparing for CAT. The Big Three (TIME, IMS and CL) may be the most sought after test-series programs. But Bullseye has an equally dedicated service for CAT preparation. The site allows you to create a free account initially and appear for their Bull Mocks, which are given by a large proportion of serious test-takers. The level of their tests has been at par with CAT, maybe even tougher. A good option to start giving tests and get a feel of the pattern, time limitations, the experience of giving an online test, the interface etc. They also have sectional tests, subject/topic-wise tests to allow you to fine-tune yourself.
    4. TIME/IMS/CL
      Let this be the final step of your preparation. Enroll in a test-series program by any one of these Big Three. Their tests are given by thousands of CAT aspirants (the last TIME mock that I had given was written by 17k+ candidates). They provide a broad, well-rounded analysis of your performance in different sections along with your percentile score, section-wise as well as overall scores. This gives you the best possible simulation of your overall nation-wise standing.                                                                                                                                           I hope this answer was helpful.
  16. Contrary to popular belief, I can say that more than one third of the IIM students are self-taught. When I say self taught, it includes ppl who did not attend classroom training. If I consider people who had subscribed to mock CATs and attended only GD/PI sessions then this % may go down. CAT coaching institutes will help you only to some extent. If 100% is the effort to be put in for cracking CAT then maybe 30~40% is what coaching institutes contribute. Rest relies on capabilities of individual.

    Key factors to consider whether to join coaching institute or not:

    1) If your confidence levels are high and believe that you can crack CAT on your own then attending classes is not suggestible. As an example, If you already scored more than 95 percentile in your previous attempt then it is highly likely that you don't need any coaching and can crack CAT on your own.

    2) If you are self-disciplined and religiously follow your schedule/time table then you need not attend any classes. Sometimes people join coaching institutes to get some seriousness and to prepare in a structured manner. Ppl get motivation seeing fellow students toiling hard.

    3) If you are currently studying/working at a far off location and find it difficult to attend classes then coaching institutes are not for you. Wasting time on commutation is not recommended. You can take online classes/CD or DVD driven content for your preparation, based on your needs.

    4) Most of the times ppl attend classes because their friends are going. If you feel that you can tide over this compulsion pressure then you can skip attending classes.

    Some tips and tricks for keeping you motivated during self-preparation:

    1) Stay focused on cracking CAT:

    Till you write the exam, my suggestion is not to worry about GD/PI. Focusing on acing the exam should be the single most priority. Try to avoid distractions as much as possible and make sure that you never stop preparation come what may. There are times when you feel depressed due to low scores in mock CATs. Because of this, don't stop the preparation mid-way. Irrespective of the the outcome of various negative factors, make it a point to focus on one goal.

    2) Break each section into sub-sections:

    It will be a lot easier if you split each section into smaller ones to analyse your areas of strengths and weaknesses. This will help you in understanding where do you stand in the overall

    3) Never leave any section un-attended

    Irrespective of whether you are comfortable with any topic or not, I suggest skimming through all the topics in a section to make sure you are 100% confident. There will be times when easiest questions will appear from the sections you might have left.

    4) Time Management

    Squeeze in atleast 4~5 hours of preparation every day. Wake up early where you can spend a minimum of 3 quality hours towards your preparation. Even though there is no ideal time for CAT preparation, usually 7~8 months of solid preparation is sufficient to crack the CAT. Starting serious preparation from April is sufficient if you are a repeater. The reason for not mentioning 12 months is people get exhausted by the time they reach CAT exam. Peaking too early is a drawback when you start early. You always need sufficient time to analyse your strengths and weaknesses and work upon them.

    5) Use mock CATs wisely

    Mock CATs by TIME, CL and IMS will help you in getting acclimatized to real one. Try to subscribe to at least one of them and analyse your performance among the best  lot of CAT aspirants. Whatever strategies you plan, try to implement them in mock CATs and make sure you have a final 2~3 strategies in place by October.

  17. Before we start talking abut the %iles, preparation strategies & all the stuff, let's start by the paper itself!

    Common Admission Test (CAT)

    • Computer Based Test
    • Time: 180mins (60mins each for all 3 sections)
    • Questions: 100(VA-34; LRDI-32; QA-34)
    • Sections: Verbal & Reading Comprehension (VRC); Logical Reasoning & Data Interpretation (LRDI); Quantitative Ability (QA)

    All specific details as per CAT 2015 & are subject to change in future!

    ## In general exam is conducted in the last week of November, on yearly basis!


    PREPARATION

    Well, that depends on how you want to tackle it!

    Either you can enroll yourself to any classroom program or you can do self study & join any online mock series next year.

    In case you tag plan to along second choice, this is what you can do:

    Enroll to Career Launcher  & Takshzila shikshak  on YouTube!

    If you can devote yourself to a classroom program later on, I'll suggest you to join Career Launcher, as the mentors there will work there ass off to assist & facilitate you.

    Meanwhile buy any good relevant topics related books (Arun Sharma for Verbal, Quant & LRDI) n target 1 topic each every day!

    Also as you plan to start your prep form Feb-March, these are few things that can help you:

    • Read a loads of good book from different areas/genres. This will make you well-read that comes handy given the number of RC questions CAT gives now. For the same please refer to this link containing this answer already shared. Himanshu Aggarwal's answer to What is the best book for verbal ability for the CAT?
    • Give more attention to basics rather than just learning the techniques for particular question types.
    • Do atleast 1 set of LR & DI each on regular basis! Believe me save you from a lot of trouble in later stages.
    • Read a good news paper to be familiar of what's going around. This will also be helpful in building a good vocab while improving your GK which is asked in other exams..(XAT as well..!\m/)
    • If possible, start watching to different Youtube videos for analysis of prev exam papers. This will give a good insight of what happened with those who appeared in earlier years.

    I hope you'll be able to get most out of your preparation.

    All the best!

  18. *What should be my approach and CAT percentile to get into IIMs ?

    -You should have to do follow these points given below:-

    (1)Give mock tests:-

    -By giving it you will analyse your results your strengths and weaknesses . Once you know your weakness or conceptual mistakes then work on those topics where you are making conceptual mistakes.

    -Your main aim should be to solve accurately with speed .Only accuracy is not important but number of attempts also matter.

    -There are three types of question levels usually – easy, medium and hard.

    (2)Join online site :-

    -First of all, get CAT preparation material from some good online site like iQuanta (one of the best online site for CAT Preparation) provides good materials as well as concept.

    24 x 7 doubts clearance is the best part of this coaching classes.

    – All the materials are provided in low reasonable price .

    – Join the group Log into Facebook ( Log into Facebook | Facebook )

    -If you join iQuanta then no need to study with books as they covers whole syllabus .

    -They provide some easy tricks so that you solve the same question earlier than others.

    -As a result, CAT preparation group has become the Largest group of aspirants with nearly 2 lakh members and highly active.

    (3) Practise,practise and practise :-

    – Practise as much as you can.Once you write more tests, CAT exam will become easier to you.

    (4)Percentile matters more:-

    -In the CAT exam,one should have to score minimum 90 percentile and score minimum 80 percentile in each of the three sections to get IIMs .

    -Some parameters which are always looked were as follows:-

    (a)CAT exam score

    (b)10th Marks

    (c)12th Marks

    (d)Graduation Marks.

    (e)Masters degree Marks.

    -Choosing iQuanta will never gonna make you feel sorry as they have a team of experienced faculties and mentors who have taught 5000+ MBA aspirants and helped them to qualify for best B-Schools across the country. In a short duration of 3 years they

    have more than 100+ students in IIMS,30+ in XLRI,20+ in IIFT,10+ in FMS and many

    in other good B-Schools like NMIMS,SIBM,SCMHRD ETC.

    -Success stories of student’s from iQuanta:-

    My journey from nowhere to IIM Bangalore, the place to “B”

    CAT tips by Gursimran Ahuja : IIM A,B,C Convert

    3 Attempts, 2 Disappointments, Finally 99.6%le

    Cracking CAT in 4 months : Debarshee Mitra, IIM C

    Success Story of RAJAN BURMAN, an IIM Lucknow convert!!

    The CAT success story of Akshat!!

    The CAT story of Anubhav Sinha, an IIM L and FMS convert!

    Preparation strategy of IIM L convert Pratik Ranjan

    The CAT Story of Sandeep Patra, an iQuanta student

    Log In or Sign Up to View

    -For more details about the website you can go through the link iQUANTA

    -For enrolling in their program you can visit: iQuanta – Online CAT Coaching for MBA

    -Fb link- Log into Facebook | Facebook

    -You have a lot of time. Keep preparing .

    All the best for your CAT preparation.

  19. A total of 20 candidates have scored an overall 100 percentile in CAT 2017. Two women candidates and Non-Engineers are amongst CAT 2017 Toppers! IIMs declared CAT results on January 8, 2018.

    So, one should make it clear that those who secure good percentiles and got IIMs are also human beings, there is nothing unnatural with them. It is only their determination and focus towards the exam who made them confident in acquiring good percentiles.

    Getting into IIMs will consider a lot of factors:

    1) Your school and college grades,

    2) your work exp. (if available), and

    3) your CAT score.

    Most people can only acquire factor 3 by the time they start thinking about CAT. So your best bet would be to score as high as you can score in CAT and hope for the best. However chances are high that if your college or school grades are not high. And from my point of view,iQuanta(one of the leading brands in CAT Preparation) and their faculties approach towards their students is going to help a lot.

    First of all, get CAT preparation material of some good coaching institute.

    For Quant, there are two good books- Arun Sharma & Sarvesh Varma. You can refer to any of these. I referred the latter one as suggested by one of my friends. However, I think the former is more popular with the students. Both the books are good. But don’t buy both. No need to unnecessary collect a lot of books & material. If you have limited time, solving one book is enough. Go for the second book only when you have finished the entire syllabus.

    No special book for concepts of Data Interpretation, Logical Reasoning and Verbal Ability. You can rely on the coaching material(if available) or you can go for iQuantas’s material that’s enough for all the concepts and can solve all the practice questions. However, you can refer to some books on these topics only after you finish the entire syllabus.

    For Verbal, you also need to read “Word Power made Easy” by Norman Lewis. It is a very good book which helps in increasing vocabulary not by memorising stuff, but by understanding the ideas behind the words. It is distributed into 45-47 sessions meant to be read one at a time. It is a must-read book and should be completed within two months of starting your preparation.

    You also need to read a few good story books as explained in the next point.

    That’s it. Yes, you do not need any other book for concepts. This much is enough.

    After this step, you should go for Test Series(You can opt for iQuanta’s Test Series-one of the best in the country)-This is like the Holy Grail of CAT preparation. Subscribe to one good Test Series and write all the tests very sincerely in simulated environment. Fix a day, say Sunday, fix a time, say 9 AM, and give the test every week at the same time. Sit in proper position while attempting the test and tell all your roommates or family members not to disturb you at that time.

    Once you write 15-20 such tests, CAT will no longer be a stranger to you. When you will sit for actual CAT, you will feel as if you have done this a lot of times and it will help you to remain confident during the exam.

    Most coaching institutes try to set the Mock Question paper to be as near to the real exam as possible. Subscribe to a test series which is more difficult(iQuanta’s Test Series has got some good level) than actual CAT. You may find it difficult to score good in the mock tests. But it will boost your confidence when you will find the actual CAT to be easier than the mock tests. Many good test series are available.

    Choosing iQuanta will never gonna make you feel sorry as they have a team of experienced faculties and mentors who have taught 5000+ MBA aspirants and helped them to qualify for best B-Schools across the country. In a short duration of 3 years they have more than 100+ students in IIMS,30+ in XLRI,20+ in IIFT,10+ in FMS and many in other good B-Schools like NMIMS,SIBM,SCMHRD ETC.

    Success stories of student’s from iQuanta:

    http://iquanta.in/blog/my-journe

    http://iquanta.in/blog/cat-tips-

    http://iquanta.in/blog/3-attempt

    http://iquanta.in/blog/success-s

    http://iquanta.in/blog/success-s

    http://iquanta.in/blog/the-cat-s

    http://iquanta.in/blog/the-cat-s

    http://iquanta.in/blog/preparati

    http://iquanta.in/blog/the-cat-s

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/913953/

    For more details about the website you can go through the link iQUANTA

    For enrolling in their program you can visit: http://iquanta.in/course/full-co

    Fb link- https://www.facebook.com/groups/

    ALL THE BEST FOR YOUR CAT PREPARATIONS

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