How would a college/university student know his headings and subheadings from the textbook by studying for an open book test? What if they don't have a heading and subheading from their textbook?

If your University textbook doesn't have headings and subheadings, you should create them yourself.

Anytime there is a line break, an extra line between two blocks of text, a new subject is usually being introduced.

For every block of text, identify the subject by the number of sentences that refer to the subject, usually a noun, i.e World War I. This noun may be qualified by adjectives, such as “the start” or “life during” or similar and some statement about it's importance, such as “poverty grew" or “people rationed food."

These can be considered subheadings.

Headings are usually created for a series of subheading sections where the topic relates to the same subject.

Anyone can find topics by highlighting frequently used nouns–person's, places, or things about which most of the writing is about.

2 Replies to “How would a college/university student know his headings and subheadings from the textbook by studying for an open book test? What if they don't have a heading and subheading from their textbook?”

  1. ALL textbooks I have ever seen, and I have seen a lot, have headings and subheadings. The Heading is the title of the chapter, unit, etc. The subheadings are the headings under the title.

    If, by chance, the textbook does not have headings or subheadings, it is probably not a textbook. But if they didn’t then the subject being discussed is the same as the heading and all the information (or details) under that would be subheadings or details.

  2. Heading=General Topic

    Subheading=Section of/Angle on General Topic

    Text body underneath the two=replaying the same topic in detail

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