In football, what is a slot back?

A slot back is basically a slot receiver who lines up in the backfield.

This page is pretty instructional.
http://www1.phillyburbs.com/foot…

It says:
"The flanker can also become a slot receiver or slot back. If he’s positioned between the split end and a tackle, his name changes. The coach can take out a tight end, making a slot back the third receiver, attempting to create mismatches with the defense. But even in a standard set that includes a tight end, the receiver can line up between the split end and the tackle and be called a slot back. This gives him a few steps running start before the defender can smack him one."

Wikipedia says a slot back is:
"A receiver lining up in the offensive back field. Canadian and Arena football allow them to take a running start at the line. They are usually larger players as they need to make catches over the middle. In American football slot backs are typically used in flexbone or other triple option offenses while Canadian football uses them in almost all formations."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wid…

Is the downvote-answer feature necessary on Quora?

Yes.  Without downvoting, I think you open Quora up to non-constructive answers which weaken the strength of the site. See What are good and bad reasons to downvote answers on Quora? That question has a number of answers that get at this point. That question and its answers also support the secondary point that Justin Bishop is making — which I agree with — that unfair/unreasonable downvoting is demoralizing.

What are the best "value for your money" restaurants in Philadelphia?

My wife and I, as well as our friends, love to eat at the Sang Kee Noodle House Asian Restaurant.  There are several locations in Philly but we most often visit the one in Wynnewood on the Main Line.

The Asian food is consistently delicious, reasonably priced, and served with quickly, efficiently, and pleasantly by an excellent staff.  You will be treated with kindness when you enter, fed well while you're there, and leave completely satisfied … eager to return next time.

BTW, try to avoid times when it will be very busy like Friday and Saturday evenings.

What other choices do I have besides JavaScript for programming web browsers?

There is also Google Web Toolkit (http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/) which allows you to write in Java and essentially compile to JavaScript. Many of their products like gmail and maps are written using this framework. Haven't used it myself but the results sort of speak for themselves.

Is the PROcede for the BMW 335/135 worth getting?

As Bojan Kahvedzic mentioned above, you're probably going to shorten the life of your engine and related drivetrain components with any hardcore tune. The N54 engine already runs hot and is prone to go into limp mode if driven hard on a track stock, so adding a chip will only exacerbate this issue.

Dinan offers a more sophisticated, expensive tune, but they don't make as much power as a Procede or JB3 chip. On the plus side, the more conservative tune preserves engine life…a little.

Nevertheless, it's up to you if you want to go the chip route. It's a ton of fun, but keep in mind the risks you're running. Looking back, I definitely would have tried the JB3, but I certainly would not have kept the car beyond the factory warranty.

Here's the best source I've come across for comparing different tunes.

http://www.e90post.com/forums/sh…

Is there a closed form expression for this 2D generalization of the Fibonacci sequence?

You've essentially described the Delannoy Numbers.  See http://www.research.att.com/~nja… for a list of references.

This isn't exactly a closed form, but here's a formula that might be helpful to you:

[math] f(x,y) = \sum_{d=0}^{\min\{x-1,y-1\}} 2^d \binom{x-1}{d}\binom{y-1}{d}.[/math]

How do you make the best pizza dough?

You need wheat flour, water, yeast and salt. I also use a bit of olive oil.

The wheat flour would be labeled "typo 00" in Italy, which means it has a lot of gluten and a high protein content. (I don't know the US categories, so someone might want one to suggest an edit here and add this information).

Use a mixer with dough hooks.

If you use fresh yeast:

  • Dissolve 20-25 g of yeast in 300 ml water at room temperature (a fork helps)
  • Put 500 g of wheat flour in a bowl
  • Start mixing and add the water with the yeast in small portions. Mix thoroughly – it takes time!

If you use dry yeast:

  • Put 500 g of wheat flour in a bowl and add the dried yeast. Blend with a fork. Move the mix to the margins of the bowl to create a pit in the middle.
  • Pour 300 ml of water at room temperature into the pit.
  • Start mixing in the center of the bowl, collecting the flour mix from the rim in small portions. Mix thoroughly—it takes time!

Continue (in both cases) like this:

  • The dough is supposed to be elastic; if not add some more flour or water, but only very little at once! It is OK when your mixing machine starts to protest.
  • Let the dough rest for a few minutes.
  • Then add a tea spoon of salt to the bowl and a table spoon of olive oil. Knead the dough with your hands for five minutes so that salt and oil are slowly worked into it. If do it with clean hands, the dough won't stick to them when your finished.
  • Put a towel on the bowl and let the dough prove at room temperature for app. 90 minutes. Alternatively, you can put wrap on the bowl and let it prove in your fridge (make sure to have enough headroom!). It will prove within 4 hours there and stay fresh for more than 48 hours, so you can prepare your dough days before.

If your ready for your pizza production, make four (thick) to six (thin) portions and roll the dough on plenty of wheat flour to the size you like. Roll it immediately before the pizza goes into the oven; if you can cook only one or two at a time, have the other dough balls covered with your towel.

Pizza is all about heat. Heat your oven to the max, put the pizza onto a solid oven tray (pre-heat it if you can) and use one of the bottom slots. Don't overload it with ingredients.

Enjoy!

How difficult is it to travel around Moscow, knowing only English?

Not very difficult.
It is easy to get from the airport to a hotel and to major tourist sites. Some taxi drivers speak English and if they don't, they will at least know those popular locations.
Taking the metro around is also a good option, but not as easy. There are very few maps of the metro system in the stations and all station names and announcements are in Russian. But if you have a metro map, check the color/number of the lines and count the number of stations you should be able to get around pretty well.
In hotels and cafes or restaurants you should also be able to find people who speak English and the popular restaurants have English menus, so overall I don't see any issues if you stay in central Moscow.